Stormwater

Contact

James Vaden
County Stormwater Director
233 E. Gay Street
Lebanon, TN 37087
615-443-2120
615-443-6190 Fax
utjames@wilsoncountytn.gov

Illicit Discharges To Streams
Be aware of any spillage, dumping, or discharge of any illicit material into a stream or drain leading to a stream. Call us, or email us, if you are aware of any contamination occurring. We confidentially will check it out and take appropriate action. Together we can improve water quality in Wilson County!

Volunteer and Educational Opportunities

New Regulations - Buffers - 1" infiltration
We have updated our buffer rules to better protect our streams and will be adopting new 1" infiltration rules by March 2016. Let us know if you want to give any input.

Wilson County Stormwater Group
The group with representives from Lebanon, Mt. Juliet and Wilson County meets on the 1st or 3rd Wednesday at 8:00AM at Shoney's. Call (615) 483-9070 to check the date of the next meeting. We discuss any and all topics related to Stormwater and welcome community input in all things Stormwater for Wilson County.

Wilson County Requirements:

What is storm water?

The flow of water that results from precipitation and which occurs immediately following rainfall or as a result of snowmelt.

When a rainfall event occurs, several things can happen to the precipitation. Some of the precipitation infiltrates into the soil surface, some is taken up by plants, and some is evaporated into the atmosphere. storm water is the rest of the precipitation that runs off land surfaces and impervious areas.

Storm water discharges are generated by precipitation and runoff from land, pavements, building rooftops and other surfaces. These hardened surfaces are called ‘impervious surfaces’ and they do not allow rainfall to infiltrate into the soil surface like natural vegetation, so more of the rainfall becomes storm water runoff. Storm water runoff accumulates pollutants such as oil and grease, chemicals, nutrients, metals, and bacteria as it travels across land. Heavy precipitation or snowmelt can also cause sewer overflows that may contaminate water sources with untreated human and industrial waste, toxic materials, and other debris.

Why be concerned?

Storm water runoff can have a number of impacts. As development and imperviousness increase in an area, the natural capacity of the soil and vegetation to infiltrate and take up rainfall decreases, and more rainfall becomes storm water runoff. This can produce negative impacts by causing erosion of land areas and stream banks, by causing or increasing flooding and also by carrying pollutants to surface waters. As Wilson County grows, development increases. When more houses, roads and businesses are constructed, water has nowhere to go and can cause serious drainage, pollutant, and sanitation problems. Continued development causes:

  • Increased Imperviousness
  • Increased Runoff
  • Increased Pollutants
  • Impact to Stream banks
  • Erosion/Sedimentation

Store Water Runoff

Storm water runoff may be carried through natural or manmade drainage ways or conveyance systems. In some cases storm water runoff leaves a site spread out over a large dispersed area as “sheet flow.” It may also be conveyed through natural ditches, swales and natural drainage features. In most developing and urbanizing areas, storm water is conveyed through a system of catch basins and pipes commonly referred to as a storm sewer system.

Public awareness of the potential impacts of storm water runoff.

Storm Water Culprits

Public awareness is an important part of storm water pollutant reduction. Unfortunately not everyone is currently aware that the decisions they make can have an impact on storm water pollution. As an example, some people assume that storm water runoff that enters a storm sewer system is being routed to some type of treatment process before entering our surface waters. In Wilson county, there is no pre-treatment of storm water. Storm sewer systems are designed simply to capture the storm water and convey it to the nearest surface water.

Activities that citizens can be involved with to help control storm water pollution

Many of our daily activities have the potential to cause storm water pollution. Any situation where activities can contribute more pollutants to storm water runoff is an area that should be considered in attempts to minimize impacts. The list below is certainly not all inclusive, but it gives an idea of things citizens can do to help control storm water pollution.

  • Maintain buffer areas around stream segments to protect stream banks and to provide a mechanism for pollutant removal.
  • Minimize impervious areas to reduce runoff.
  • Design all new construction to prevent or minimize runoff and storm water pollution – a major component here is planning up front in the design process to consider and manage potential storm water problems.
  • Practice “good housekeeping” by keeping areas clean of potentially harmful pollutants. This also may involve changing activities or practices if they have potential impacts.
  • Use lawn care practices that protect water quality – minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides, and when used, do so in a safe manner. When possible incorporate native plant species since they are best adapted to the local growing conditions and tend to be naturally pest resistant.
  • Properly use and store household materials and be aware of and make use of local recycling and collection centers to handle household wastes.
  • Remember that any materials that are poured or placed on the ground, streets, driveways, etc. can be picked up and carried by storm water runoff to our surface waters
  • Report any pollution, illegal dumping, or soil erosion that you see to the appropriate authorities.
  • Get involved with local efforts for public education, water quality monitoring, stream cleanup, recycling, etc. 

Midway

 

 

Volunteer / Education

 

TN Healthy Watershed
Ongoing work under this "green infrastructure" grant at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center includes pervious pavement, rain gardens and a constructed wet land. Contact us to volunteer to help plant, a tour or more information.

Stream Buffers Regulations
We have updated our buffer rules to better protect our streams and will be adopting new 1" infiltration rules by March 2016. Let us know if you want to give any input.

Wilson County Stormwater Group
The group with representives from Lebanon, Mt. Juliet and Wilson County meets on the 1st or 3rd Wednesday at 8:00AM at Shoney's. Call (615) 483-9070 to ceck the date of the next meeting. We discuss any and all topics related to Stormwater and welcome community input in all things Stormwater for Wilson County.

 

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